TEN-T Corridors




The European policy for Trans-European Networks (TENs) for transport, energy and telecommunications was born in 1993 on the basis of Title XVI, articles 170 172 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

TENs allow the operation of the internal market, linking European regions one with each other and connecting Europe with the rest of the world. In essence, the creation and development of TENs aim at the interconnection of national infrastructure networks ensuring interoperability with interventions based on the definition of common standards for the removal of technical barriers.

Regulation (EU) No. 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 sets common guidelines for the development of a European transport network based on double-layer structure consisting of the core (central) network and the comprehensive (global) network.
Core corridors of the TEN - T are:

  • Scandinavian-Mediterranean
  • North Sea-Baltic
  • North Sea-Mediterranean
  • Baltic-Adriatic
  • Orient-East Med
  • Rhine-Alpine
  • Atlantic
  • Rhine-Danube
  • Mediterranean

INSERIRE MAPPA DEI CORE CORRIDOR DELLA RETE TEN
For more information about the characteristics of the corridors such as the definition of routes and lines, the analysis of the reference transport market and the list of projects, please refer to studies published by the European Union at the following link

 



TEN-T corridors crossing Italy are:
 

  • Baltic-Adriatic corridor: It extends from the Polish ports of Gdansk and Gdynia and Szczecin and Swinoujscie and, passing through the Czech Republic or Slovakia and eastern Austria, reaches the Slovenian port of Koper and the Italian ports of Trieste, Venice and Ravenna. The corridor includes railways, roads, airports, ports and railway terminals Road (RRT). The main projects are the Semmering base tunnel and the Koralm railway line (Graz-Klagenfurt) in Austria.

  • Scandinavian-Mediterranean corridor: it extends from the Finnish-Russian border and the Finnish ports of HaminaKotka, Helsinki and Turku-Naantali in Stockholm (through "motorway of the sea") and, with a section starting from Oslo, across southern Sweden, Denmark, Germany (with connections to the ports of Bremen, Hamburg and Rostock), western Austria, Italy (linking the ports of La Spezia, Livorno, Ancona, Bari, Taranto, Naples and Palermo) and reaches Malta through "motorway of sea". The corridor includes railways, roads, airports, ports, rail-road terminals (RRT) and sections of "motorways of the sea". The main projects of this corridor are the Fehmarn Belt fixed link and the Brenner base tunnel.

  • Rhine-Alpine corridor: connects the North Sea ports of Antwerp, Rotterdam and Amsterdam and the Italian port of Genoa through the valley of the Rhine, Basel and Milan. The corridor includes railways, roads, airports, ports, rail-road terminals and the Rhine as a waterway. The main projects of this corridor are the two alpine base tunnels of Gotthard and Lötschberg and the respective access lines.

  • Mediterranean corridor: connects the ports of Algeciras, Cartagena, Valencia, Tarragona and Barcelona, the Iberian Peninsula, with Hungary and the Ukrainian border, through the South of France (Marseille), Lyon, northern Italy and Slovenia, with a section in Croatia. The corridor includes railways, roads, airports, ports and rail-road terminals and, in northern Italy, the inland waterway constituted by the Po River. The main projects of the corridor are the upgrading of railway lines in Spain according to UIC standard gauge, the railway tunnel Lyon-Turin and the Trieste / Koper - Lјublјana through the karst region.

For more information about the characteristics of the corridors such as the definition of routes and lines, the analysis of the reference transport market and the list of projects, please refer to studies published by the European Union at the following link
 



EU Regulation n. 1315/2013 provides that for each of the corridors of the TEN - T the Commission designate a European coordinator to carry out the following functions:

  • Supports the coordinated implementation of the core network corridor and in particular the timely implementation of the work plan for the single corridor;

  • Preparing the work plan in cooperation with the Member States and monitoring its implementation;

  • Consult the corridor Forum in relation to the work plan and its implementation;

  • Reporting to the Member States, the Commission and, where appropriate, to all other entities directly involved in the development of the core network corridor on any difficulties encountered and, especially when it prevented the development of a corridor in order to help find appropriate solutions;

  • Drawing up an annual report to the European Parliament, the Council, the Commission and the Member States concerned on progress achieved in the implementation of the corridor;

  • Examining the application of transport services, the possibilities of financing investment, the steps to be undertaken and the conditions to be met to facilitate access to forms of funding and make appropriate recommendations.

The European Coordinator may consult with the Member States concerned, the regional and local authorities, the transport operators, transport users and representatives of civil society, in relation to the work plan and its realization.

The Member States concerned shall cooperate with the European Coordinator and provide the necessary information to carry out the tasks outlined in this article, including the information concerning the development of the corridors, which are present in any national infrastructure plan.



EU Regulation n. 1315/2013 establishes the following deadlines to be met for the implementation of the common standards established for railway:

  • 2030 for the central (core) network;
  • 2050 per for the global (comprehensive) network